VIDAL SASOON


VIDAL SASOON

sassoon

(17 January 1928 – 9 May 2012)  Look at that mug! What a doll face;)

Everyone here at Voodoo Hair Lounge would like to take a moment and give a shout out to the godfather of hair, Vidal Sassoon.  Raised in a Jewish orphanage in London, Sassoon grew up a man with an edge.  After the war, he joined the 43 Group, an organization of Jewish street toughs who broke up pro-fascist rallies in Britain, sometimes violently. He was known to carry a knife and once showed up bloodied to his apprenticeship at a barber shop in the ghetto.Sassoon stated his intentions in designing new, more efficient, hair styles: “If I was going to be in hairdressing, I wanted to change things. I wanted to eliminate the superfluous and get down to the basic angles of cut and shape.” The man made wearable hair modern with geometric yet organic shapes and he did it with style.  In 1963, Sassoon created a short, angular hairstyle cut on a horizontal plane that was the recreation of the classic “bob cut.” His geometric haircuts seemed to be severely cut, but were entirely lacquer-free, relying on the natural shine of the hair for effect.  Heads turned and women raced to salons when he cut Mia Farrow’s lovely locks for Rosemary’s Baby in 1968. The stylists who worked under him knew this very well. “He was crazy,” one said. Bad haircuts would be mercilessly criticized, and stylists who showed up to work without their shoes shined would be sent home.  Sassoon was a key force in the commercial direction of hair styling. His Vidal Sassoon brand was applied to shampoos and conditioners sold worldwide, with a commercial campaign featuring the iconic slogan “If you don’t look good, we don’t look good.” Former salon colleagues also bought Sassoon’s salons and acquired the right to use his name, extending the brand in salons into the United Kingdom and the United States. For more inspiration involving the late-great hair master check out the documentary “Vidal Sassoon: The Movie.”